From December, 2005

Jacob’s New Store

Design Magazine, Frame, has published an interesting article on the design of Jacob Arabo’s new Diamond mine inspired Manhattan store: “Russian-born jeweller Jacob Arabo, who started out as an immigrant in New York City, is currently living the American dream. From a rough stall in the Diamond District, Arabo made his name (today they call him ‘Jacob the Jeweler’: no kidding) by designing opulent accoutrements for the celebrity elite – rapper 50 Cent, actress Angela Bassett and model Gisele Bundchen wear his watches – and by carrying on the centuries-old tradition of creating precious objects for royalty. Arabo banks on…

No Hands

A decade before Issey Miyake came out with the TO or years before Ron Arad did “Look Ma, No Hands” for Alessi, there was the Time Dimension. Designed by Hans Donner in collaboration with watchmaker, Bernhard Lederer, the watch took nine years to make and was probably the first watch to contain three discs instead of hands to tell time. (I’m not sure how accurate I am, but feel free to correct me if I’m wrong – Editor) The idea of Time Dimension wasn’t intended to be limited only to a wrist watch. Donner envisioned even making monumental clocks for…

First Commercial E-paper Watch

Seiko unveils their first commercial version of the e-paper watch that we covered back in July. The company intends to release only 500 units of the watch in January and hopes to use the novelty of the product to spark new demand for such wristwatches. related links Popgadget: Bendable E-paper Watch (via Gizmodo) Wf: Basel 2005: Seiko’s Big Turn Update: The price will be $2500. (Source: Timezone)

Body based technology

Newsweek Magazine files in a report about the potential of body based technology that allows the human body to act as a wireless networking tool. This very technology is central to Docomo’s concept wristwatch-phone that transfers the voice signal through your body: In his gadget-filled office at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Prof. Kohji Mitsubayashi tells a visitor to touch a transmitter with one hand and a receiver with another. Voila! A jaunty TV jingle blares from a pair of attached speakers. Surprised, the visitor releases both gadgets, and the music stops. The simplicity and strangeness of becoming a human…